An Overview of Spring|Summer 2014 at Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week NYC

From the obscure to the mainstays, Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week is always fashionable in an unexpected way through its bevy of shows. From one season to another, these designers always leave an impression. Below, are some highlights from the week:

BCBG Max Azria | A key player from day one, BCBG Max Azria gave you the feeling as if one had been transported back in time. I’m thinking this was no coincidence since next year will be the brand’s 25th year. In viewing this collection, one was able to see how they had taken key pieces from past collections and put a fresh spin on them. The light color palette of whites, blushes, and chambray were attractive and a sure pleaser for spring along with the weightless fabrics. Sheer paneling, drapery, and bold florals were complimented by natural hair and makeup.

BCBG Max Azria - Spring|Summer 2014

 

Tadashi Shoji | Where BCBG Max Azria gave us fluidity, Tadashi Shoji gave us ladylike pieces. A designer known for his red carpet gowns and evening wear, Mr. Shoji brought a modernized garden party feel. There’s always a strong feminine presence in his work, but his latest collection felt almost sweet-like. The sherbet-inspired palette of pale pink, pearl, lemon, and lavender overtook his Spring|Summer 2014 collection. There was heavy use of silk organza, tulle, and intricate lattice lace. And an almost retro feel came forth in the full skirts and sheath dresses, which were paired with crop tops. His beautiful gowns really showed why this designer is a staple during award show seasons. There were sheer skirts, scalloped shell, and ostrich-feather fringe, giving off a youthful yet confident feel and very apropos to his “Sweet Liberation” theme.

Tadashi Shoji - Spring|Summer 2014

 

Prabal Gurung | Inspiration for designers come in all forms and for Prabal Gurung it came in the form of 1950s icon Marilyn Monroe. Before his show, Mr. Gurung was quoted saying, “It’s a celebration of the elegant woman; she’s becoming an endangered species.” The color white flourished before transitioning to muted pastels. The notion of ’50s elegance came to light with below-the-knee silhouettes, boxy tops, narrow pencil skirts, wiggle and sheath dresses. The modernized twenty-first century portion was executed brilliantly: there were PVC pencil skirts and a tweed bouclé woven on plastic thread.

Prabal Gurung - Spring|Summer 2014

 

Jenny Packham | Where Mr. Gurung brought us a feel of modernized 1950s fashion, Jenny Packham took us on a ride twenty years later with an infusion of ’70s prints and a touch of somber Edwardian attire. The stripes checkered and polka dots were mimicked in pearl and Swarovski beading. Translucent, flowing organza added a whimsical and romantic feel, but it was the waists cinched with satin ribbons that rung in the Edwardian era. Packham, though has always been known for her beading, spoke volumes to her mastery with a taupe chiffon dress embellished with tiny pink rosettes as well as with multiple crystal-covered gowns.

Jenny Packham - Spring|Summer 2014

 

Giulietta | Coming off of femininity and beading from Jenny Packham, Giulietta from designer Sofia Sizzi was oh-so-chic. A palette of primarily black and white, standouts included a dandelion print on a timeless black dress and blouse with a matching pant. Clean lines, classic styling, and simplistic structure, accompanied by a strong red lip. This collection is for the heroine, strong willed woman that is influenced by the nature of her surroundings.

Giulietta - Spring|Summer 2014

 

Deconstructed or reconstructed, flowing or fitted, there were pieces for any wardrobe; new collections that made us all lust for spring. | Marielle Larkin

 

 

 

 

pictures courtesy John Aquino, Robert Mitra

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